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  Hanadie Yousef is a trained stem cell biologist and neurobiologist with a focus on the mechanisms of aging, with pending and issued patents, several publications, a BS from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), a PhD from UC Berkeley, a 4-year postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford School of Medicine, experience leading research teams, and has worked in R&D at  Regeneron and Genentech.    Yousef began doing biomedical research at the age of 16, when she interned locally at a pharmaceutical company in New York where she grew up, Regeneron, to conduct research on gene therapy and cancer. It was at this time that Yousef fell in love with drug discovery and development and knew she wanted to dedicate the rest of her life to this pursuit. She skipped a grade and attended CMU to study chemistry and continue her passion in scientific research. She returned to Regeneron to continue her research during winter and summer internships for 5 years (2003-2008). During her undergraduate studies at CMU, Yousef did a research honors thesis in the Kaminski lab at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, where she elucidated molecular mechanisms driving idiopathic pulmonary lung fibrosis.    In graduate school in the Schaffer and Conboy labs at UC Berkeley (2008-2013),  Dr.  Yousef studied the role of adult stem cells in the biology of aging and developed methods for tissue rejuvenation in brain and muscle. She published 4 first-author papers, a research perspective,and has an issued patent and a patent application based on her discoveries.

PETER JACKSON, PHD
ADVISORY BOARD MEMBER

Peter Jackson is a Professor in the Baxter Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Jackson returned to Stanford in 2013 after eight years as a Staff Scientist and Director at Genentech Inc. in S. San Francisco, California. At Genentech, he helped define and implement the development of therapeutics for cancer pathways including cell cycle checkpoints, stress pathways, and tumor metabolism. Before joining Genentech in 2005, he spent 10 years on the faculty at Stanford University School of Medicine. His laboratory has been involved in studies of cell cycle biochemistry, regulation of the cancer by kinases and phosphatases, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and the discovery of a new physiological class of competitive (“pseudosubstrate”) E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors, exemplified by the APC/C regulator Emi1.

Since 2005, his lab has focused on signaling through the primary cilium, using proteomic approaches to define regulatory networks and new disease genes. More broadly, the lab has connected many proteins defective in human diseases and cancer to new complexes and pathways, with a view to discovering molecular signatures for diagnostics and therapeutic development. His research has earned him numerous visiting lectureships and honors, including awards from the Baxter Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the American Cancer Society, the Pluto Society, and being a Stanford Hume Faculty Scholar and a Kirsch Scholar, and elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (in 2008).

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